Undergraduate Courses

FILM 045: Dance on Film

An examination of dance on film from c. 1920 to the present, including early Hollywood pictures, the rise of Bollywood, avant-garde films of the postwar period, translations of stage choreography to screen, music videos, and dance film festivals. The impact of industry, circulation and audience, aesthetic lineages, and craft in the union of the two mediums. Students develop an original short film for a final class project.

No prior dance or filmmaking experience necessary. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Emily Coates
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: TTh 9am-10:15am

FILM 099: Film and the Arts

A study of cinema as it developed into a significant art form, including its interactions with fiction, theater, and painting. Focus on André Bazin’s reflections on cinema in response to Chaplin, Welles, and Cocteau, as well as to writers such as Faulkner, Sartre, and Malraux.

Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

 

Professor: Dudley Andrew
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: MW 1pm-2:15pm; M 6:30pm-9pm

FILM 150: Introduction to Film Studies

A survey of film studies concentrating on theory, analysis, and criticism. Students learn the critical and technical vocabulary of the subject and study important films in weekly screenings.

Prerequisite for the major.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: John MacKay, Professor: Rizvana Bradley
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: TTh 1:30pm-2:20pm

FILM 160: Introduction to Media

Introduction to the long history of media as understood in classical and foundational (and even more recent experimental) theories. Topics involve the technologies of modernity, reproduction, and commodity, as well as questions regarding knowledge, representation, public spheres, and spectatorship. Special attention given to philosophies of language, visuality, and the environment, including how digital culture continues to shape these realms. 

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: TTh 1:30pm-2:20pm

FILM 161: Introductory Film Writing and Directing

Problems and aesthetics of film studied in practice as well as in theory. In addition to exploring movement, image, montage, point of view, and narrative structure, students photograph and edit their own short videotapes. Emphasis on the writing and production of short dramatic scenes. Priority to majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies. Materials fee: $150.

Prerequisite for all majors: ART 142; additional prerequisite for Film & Media Studies majors: FILM 150.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 162: Introductory Documentary Filmmaking

The art and craft of documentary filmmaking. Basic technological and creative tools for capturing and editing moving images. The processes of research, planning, interviewing, writing, and gathering of visual elements to tell a compelling story with integrity and responsibility toward the subject. The creation of nonfiction narratives. Issues include creative discipline, ethical questions, space, the recreation of time, and how to represent “the truth.” Materials fee: $150.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-5:20pm

The art and craft of documentary filmmaking. Basic technological and creative tools for capturing and editing moving images. The processes of research, planning, interviewing, writing, and gathering of visual elements to tell a compelling story with integrity and responsibility toward the subject. The creation of nonfiction narratives. Issues include creative discipline, ethical questions, space, the recreation of time, and how to represent “the truth.” Materials fee: $150.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 

 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 232: Classical Hollywood Narrative 1920–1960

Survey of Classical Hollywood films. Topics include history of the studio system; origin and development of genres; the film classics of the Classical Hollywood period, and the producers, screenwriters, directors, and cinematographers who created them. 

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 233: Children and Schools in Global Cinema

Children have long been, and remain, the target of many films. They precipitated some of the earliest studies of the new medium and its regulation as well. But this seminar turns the tables on the premise that children have also been dangerous for the cinema. As subjects and actors in films, they have proven recalcitrant, unpredictable, combustible; in short, they have behaved as children often do. Insofar as cinema is an institution, children must be disciplined to ensure its smooth operation. And yet much of what is valuable in cinema involves the very unpredictability that is natural in children. This seminar operates as a dialogue between education and cinema across the living bodies of children. We give the cinema and children the first and last words in this dialogue, ‘education’ being asked to learn, not teach. We defamiliarize education by bringing into our classroom children and films foreign to the United States, including films from France, Africa, Iran, and East Asia

Foundations in Education Studies recommended.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Dudley Andrew
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: T 6:30pm-9pm; Th 9:25am-11:15am

FILM 240: World Cinema

Development of ways to engage films from around the globe productively. Close analysis of a dozen complex films, with historical contextualization of their production and cultural functions. Attention to the development of critical skills. Includes weekly screenings, each followed immediately by discussion.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Dudley Andrew
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: MWF 11:35am-12:25pm

FILM 243: Family in Greek Literature and Film

The structure and multiple appropriations of the family unit, with a focus on the Greek tradition. The influence of aesthetic forms, including folk literature, short stories, novels, and film, and of political ideologies such as nationalism, Marxism, and totalitarianism. Issues related to gender, sibling rivalry, dowries and other economic factors, political allegories, feminism, and sexual and social violence both within and beyond the family.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: George Syrimis
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: F 1:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 244: Media and Medicine in Modern America

Relationships between medicine, health, and the media in the United States from 1870 to the present. The changing role of the media in shaping conceptions of the body, creating new diseases, influencing health and health policy, crafting the image of the medical profession, informing expectations of medicine and constructions of citizenship, and the medicalization of American life.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: John Warner, Professor: Gretchen Berland
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: MW 10:30am-11:20am

FILM 275: "Atlanta": Black Media and Poetics

This course takes four modes of black cultural production as its object of inquiry:  television, contemporary art, literature, and poetry. Specific focus is on 20th century black cultural production, making use of archives relevant to this historical period. The course begins with a critical viewing and analysis of the acclaimed television show, Atlanta. We spend the first month viewing the show (which will have moved through at most, three seasons), during which students are introduced to key introductory texts on black culture and learn how to read and think about black cultural forms. This unit includes readings by Stuart Hall, James Baldwin, Richard Iton, Brent Hayes Edwards, Daphne Brooks, Tavia Nyong’o, Fred Moten, Paul Gilroy, and others. The course then turn its focus toward the literary and poetic traditions that inform the distinctly southern black vernacular history and aesthetic Atlanta draws from, and has envisioned and crafted for its televisual form. Readings include literary texts and critical prose by: Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, and James Baldwin, as well as from contemporary poets and writers: Claudia Rankine, Fred Moten, Natasha Tretheway, Terrance Hayes, Simone White, Nicole Sealy, Kevin Young, Jericho Brown.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Rizvana Bradley
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: W 3:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 307: East Asian Martial Arts Film

The martial arts film has not only been a central genre for many East Asian cinemas, it has been the cinematic form that has most defined those cinemas for others. Domestically, martial arts films have served to promote the nation, while on the international arena, they have been one of the primary conduits of transnational cinematic interaction, as kung-fu or samurai films have influenced films inside and outside East Asia, from The Matrix to Kill Bill. Martial arts cinema has become a crucial means for thinking through such issues as nation, ethnicity, history, East vs. West, the body, gender, sexuality, stardom, industry, spirituality, philosophy, and mediality, from modernity to postmodernity. It is thus not surprising that martial arts films have also attracted some of the world’s best filmmakers, ranging from Kurosawa Akira to Wong Kar Wai. This course focuses on films from Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea—as well as on works from other countries influenced by them—covering such martial arts genres such as the samurai film, kung-fu, karate, wuxia, and related historical epics. It provides a historical survey of each nation and genre, while connecting them to other genres, countries, and media.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Aaron Gerow
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:25pm

FILM 320: Close Analysis of Film

Ways in which traditional genres and alternative film forms establish or subvert convention and expectation and express thematic and ideological concerns. The balancing of narrative containment and excess, as well as action and image. Use of body and voice, space and music. Examples include films by Antonioni, Zhang, Ozu, and Hitchcock.

Prerequisite: FILM 150.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm; M 7pm-10pm

FILM 330: The Screenwriter's Craft

A rigorous writer’s workshop. Students conjure, write, rewrite, and study films. Read screenplays, view movie clips, parse films, and develop characters and a scenario for a feature length screenplay. By the end of term, each student will have created a story outline and written a minimum of fifteen pages of an original script. All majors welcome. 

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: T 2:30pm-4:30pm

FILM 346/ FILM 760: Intermediality in Film

Film is a hybrid medium, the meeting point of several others. This course focuses on the relationship of film to theater, painting, and video, suggesting that where two media are in evidence, there is usually a third. Topics include space, motion, framing, color, theatricality, tableau vivant, ekphrasis, spectatorship, and new media. Readings feature art historical and film theoretical texts as well as essays pertinent to specific films. Films by Fassbinder, Bergman, von Trier, Jarman, Godard, Haneke, Antonioni, Greenaway and others.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Brigitte Peucker
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Th 3:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 350: Screenwriting

A beginning course in screenplay writing. Foundations of the craft introduced through the reading of professional scripts and the analysis of classic films. A series of classroom exercises culminates in intensive scene work.

Prerequisite: FILM 150. Not open to freshmen.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Marc Lapadula
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: W 1:30pm-3:20pm

A beginning course in screenplay writing. Foundations of the craft introduced through the reading of professional scripts and the analysis of classic films. A series of classroom exercises culminates in intensive scene work.

Prerequisite: FILM 150. Not open to freshmen.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Marc Lapadula
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: M 3:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 355: Intermediate Film Writing and Directing

In the first half of the term, students write three-scene short films and learn the tools and techniques of staging, lighting, and capturing and editing the dramatic scene. In the second half of the term, students work collaboratively to produce their films. Focus on using the tools of cinema to tell meaningful dramatic stories. Materials fee: $150.

Enrollment limited to 8. Priority to majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies. Prerequisites: ART 241.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
 
Professor: Jonathan Andrews
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Th 8:25am-12:20pm

FILM 356: Intermediate Documentary Filmmaking

Students explore the storytelling potential of the film medium by making documentary art. The class concentrates on finding and capturing intriguing, complex scenarios in the world and then adapting them to the film form. Questions of truth, objectivity, style, and the filmmaker’s ethics are considered using examples of students’ work. Exercises in storytelling principles. Materials fee: $150.

Limited enrollment. Priority to majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies. Prerequisites: ART 141 or 142, and FILM 150.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 360: Putin's Russia and Protest Culture

Survey of Russian literature and culture since the fall of communism. The chaos of the 1990s; the solidification of power in Putin’s Russia; the recent rise of protest culture. Sources include literature, film, and performances by art collectives. Readings and discussion in English; texts available in Russian.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Marijeta Bozovic
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm

FILM 395: Intermediate Screenwriting

A workshop in writing short screenplays. Frequent revisions of each student’s script focus on uniting narrative, well-delineated characters, dramatic action, tone, and dialogue into a polished final screenplay.

Prerequisite: FILM 350. Priority to majors in Film & Media Studies.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Marc Lapadula
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: W 3:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 397: Writing about the Performing Arts

Introduction to journalistic reporting on performances as current events, with attention to writing in newspapers, magazines, and the blogosphere. The idea of the audience explored in relation to both a live act or screening and a piece of writing about such an event. Students attend screenings and live professional performances of plays, music concerts, and dance events.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

FILM 399: The Migrant Image

Cinematic as well as post-cinematic representation of both the migrant and the immigrant body; authorship of the anticolonial struggle. Focus on migrants, refugees, and immigrants, and the emergence of the “global citizen” with respect to digital artistic practices. 

Prerequisites: FILM 150 or 160; or permission of instructor.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Rizvana Bradley
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: MW 11:35am-12:50pm

FILM 406/ FILM 830: Literature into Film

Strategies employed by filmmakers who adapt literary works to the screen. Detailed comparisons between cinematic adaptations and the novels, plays, and short stories on which they are based. Case studies of literary works that pose a variety of challenges to filmmakers.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Millicent Marcus
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: M 8pm-10pm; W 3:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 419/ FILM 729: German New Waves in Cold War Europe

Comparative study of New Wave cinema in East and West Germany, with a focus on aesthetic ferment, institutional barriers, and transformation. Berlin as the best place to follow Europe’s emerging cinematic New Waves before 1961. Distinctive approaches developed by young filmmakers in East and West Germany to political and documentary filmmaking, to the Nazi past and the Cold War, and to class, gender, and social transformation.

Before 1961, Berlin was the best place in Europe to follow both Eastern and Western Europe’s emerging cinematic New Waves. And first in East, then in West Germany, young filmmakers developed distinctive approaches to political and documentary filmmaking, to the Nazi past and the Cold War, to class, gender, and social transformation. This course juxtaposes the two German New Waves, focusing on aesthetic ferment, institutional barriers, and transformation. Features, documentaries, and experimental films by Gerhard Klein, Konrad Wolf, Alexander Kluge, Herbert Vesely, Edgar Reitz, Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet, Jürgen Böttcher, Heiner Carow, Frank Beyer, Wim Wenders, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Helke Sander, Helke Misselwitz, read against other Eastern and Western New Wave films (i.e., by Lindsay Anderson, Karel Reisz, Andrzej Munk, Alain Resnais, Mikhail Kalatozov, Milos Forman).

Knowledge of German helpful but not necessary.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Katie Trumpener
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 428: Approaching Film Music

An introduction to the sonic dimensions of film from historical and critical perspectives. The seminar addresses key terms and concepts in the study of film music, covering major historical developments and theoretical concerns in European and American cinema from the silent era to the digital age. Includes occasional evening screening sessions.

No musical background is required, but in case of doubt, contact instructor. Projects are tailored towards each student’s discipline.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Gundula Kreuzer, Professor: Marco Ladd
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 429: War in Literature and Film

Representations of war in literature and film; reasons for changes over time in portrayals of war. Texts by Stendahl, Tolstoy, Juenger, Remarque, Malraux, and Vonnegut; films by Eisenstein, Tarkovsky, Joris Ivens, Coppola, Spielberg, and Altman.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Katerina Clark
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 433: Family Narratives/Cultural Shifts

This course looks at films that are redefining ideas around family and family narratives in relation to larger social movements. We focus on personal films by filmmakers who consider themselves artists, activists, or agents of change but are united in their use of the nonfiction format to speak truth to power. In different ways, these films use media to build community and build family and ultimately, to build family albums and archives that future generations can use to build their own practices. Just as the family album seeks to unite people across time, space, and difference, the films and texts explored in this course are also journeys that culminate in linkages, helping us understand nuances of identity while illuminating personal relationships to larger cultural, social, and historical movements.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-3:20pm; Su 7pm-9pm

FILM 434: Archive Aesthetics and Community Storytelling

This production course explores strategies of archive aesthetics and community storytelling in film and media. It allows students to create projects that draw from archives—including news sources, personal narratives, and found archives—to produce collaborative community storytelling. Conducted as a production workshop, the course explores the use of archives in constructing real and fictive narratives across a variety of disciplines, such as—participants create and develop autobiographies, biographies, or fiction-based projects, tailored to their own work in film/new media around Natalie Goldberg’s concept that “our lives are at once ordinary and mythical.”

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 446: Japanese Cinema before 1960

The history of Japanese cinema to 1960, including the social, cultural, and industrial backgrounds to its development. Periods covered include the silent era, the coming of sound and the wartime period, the occupation era, the golden age of the 1950s, and the new modernism of the late 1950s.

No knowledge of Japanese required. Formerly JAPN 270. 

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Aaron Gerow
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: MW 1pm-2:15pm; T 7pm-8pm

FILM 454: Narrating the Lives of Refugees

Analysis of contemporary representations of refugee experiences with special attention to the processes by which war, colonialism, displacement, encampment, and racialization shape the lives of refugees in New Haven and beyond. Topics include the representation of refugees as a source of political crisis; one dimensional representations of refugees as victims in need of rescue, national subjects unfit for citizenship, and as a political and social threat; and how current refugee problems create definitional difficulties for states and international agencies.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Zareena Grewal
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 455/ FILM 735: Documentary Film Workshop

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Film and Media Studies or American Studies who are making documentaries as senior projects.

This workshop in audiovisual scholarship explores ways to present research through the moving image. Students work within a Public Humanities framework to make a documentary that draws on their disciplinary fields of study. Designed to fulfill requirements for the M.A. with a concentration in Public Humanities.

Seniors in other majors admitted as space permits.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Charles Musser
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: T 7pm-10pm; W 10:30am-1:20pm

FILM 456/ FILM 736: Documentary Film Workshop

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Film and Media Studies or American Studies who are making documentaries as senior projects.

Seniors in other majors admitted as space permits.

This workshop in audiovisual scholarship explores ways to present research through the moving image. Students work within a Public Humanities framework to make a documentary that draws on their disciplinary fields of study. Designed to fulfill requirements for the M.A. with a concentration in Public Humanities.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Charles Musser
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: T 7pm-10pm; W 10:30am-1:20pm

FILM 457: Italian Film from Postwar to Postmodern

A study of important Italian films from World War II to the present. Consideration of works that typify major directors and trends. Topics include neorealism, self-reflexivity and metacinema, fascism and war, and postmodernism. Films by Fellini, Antonioni, Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Pasolini, Bertolucci, Wertmuller, Tornatore, and Moretti.

Most films in Italian with English subtitles.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Millicent Marcus
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: TTh 4pm-5:15pm

FILM 471: Independent Directed Study

For students who wish to explore an aspect of film and media studies not covered by existing courses. The course may be used for research or directed readings and should include one lengthy essay or several short ones as well as regular meetings with the adviser. To apply, students should present a prospectus, a bibliography for the work proposed, and a letter of support from the adviser to the director of undergraduate studies. Term credit for independent research or reading may be granted and applied to any of the requisite areas upon application and approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Katerina Clark
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019

FILM 471: Independent Directed Study

For students who wish to explore an aspect of film and media studies not covered by existing courses. The course may be used for research or directed readings and should include one lengthy essay or several short ones as well as regular meetings with the adviser. To apply, students should present a prospectus, a bibliography for the work proposed, and a letter of support from the adviser to the director of undergraduate studies. Term credit for independent research or reading may be granted and applied to any of the requisite areas upon application and approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Katerina Clark
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018

FILM 483: Advanced Film Writing and Directing

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies making senior projects. Each student writes and directs a short fiction film. The first term focuses on the screenplay, production schedule, storyboards, casting, budget, and locations. In the second term students rehearse, shoot, edit, and screen the film. Materials fee: $150.

Enrollment limited to 8. Priority to majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies. Prerequisite: ART 341.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Jonathan Andrews
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: T 1:30pm-5:20pm

FILM 484: Advanced Film Writing and Directing

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies making senior projects.Each student writes and directs a short fiction film. The first term focuses on the screenplay, production schedule, storyboards, casting, budget, and locations. In the second term students rehearse, shoot, edit, and screen the film. Materials fee: $150.

Enrollment limited to 8. Priority to majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies. Prerequisite: ART 341.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Jonathan Andrews
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: T 1:30-5:20p

FILM 487: Advanced Screenwriting

Students write a feature-length screenplay. Emphasis on multiple drafts and revision. Admission in the fall term based on acceptance of a complete step-sheet outline for the story to be written during the coming year.

Primarily for Film & Media Studies majors working on senior projects. Prerequisite: FILM 395 or permission of instructor.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Marc Lapadula
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: M 1:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 488: Advanced Screenwriting

Students write a feature-length screenplay. Emphasis on multiple drafts and revision. Admission in the fall term based on acceptance of a complete step-sheet outline for the story to be written during the coming year.

Primarily for Film & Media Studies majors working on senior projects. Prerequisite: FILM 395 or permission of instructor.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Marc Lapadula
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: W 7-8:50p

FILM 491: The Senior Essay

An independent writing and research project. A prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the end of the second week of the term in which the essay project is to commence. A rough draft must be submitted to the adviser and the director of undergraduate studies approximately one month before the final draft is due. Essays are normally thirty-five pages long (one term) or fifty pages (two terms).

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
 
Professor: Katerina Clark
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018

FILM 492: The Senior Essay

An independent writing and research project. A prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the end of the second week of the term in which the essay project is to commence. A rough draft must be submitted to the adviser and the director of undergraduate studies approximately one month before the final draft is due. Essays are normally thirty-five pages long (one term) or fifty pages (two terms).

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Katerina Clark
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019

FILM 493: The Senior Project

For students making a film or video, either fiction or nonfiction, as their senior project. Senior projects require the approval of the Film and Media Studies Committee and are based on proposals submitted at the end of the junior year. An interim project review takes place at the end of the fall term, and permission to complete the senior project can be withdrawn if satisfactory progress has not been made. For guidelines, consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Does not count toward the fourteen courses required for the major when taken in conjunction with FILM 455, 456 or FILM 483, 484.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Katerina Clark
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018

FILM 494: The Senior Project

For students making a film or video, either fiction or nonfiction, as their senior project. Senior projects require the approval of the Film and Media Studies Committee and are based on proposals submitted at the end of the junior year. An interim project review takes place at the end of the fall term, and permission to complete the senior project can be withdrawn if satisfactory progress has not been made. For guidelines, consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Does not count toward the fourteen courses required for the major when taken in conjunction with FILM 455, 456 or FILM 483, 484.

1 Yale College course credit(s)
 
 
Professor: Katerina Clark
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019