Graduate Courses

FILM 605: Film and Media Studies Certificate Workshop

The workshop is built on students’ needs and orientations. It is aimed at helping the individual trajectories of students and at deepening the topics they have met while attending seminars, conferences, and lectures. Students are required to present a final qualifying paper demonstrating their capacity to do interdisciplinary work. The workshop covers two terms and counts as one regular course credit.

Open only to students pursuing the Graduate Certificate in Film and Media Studies. Prerequisite: FILM 601.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: NA

FILM 690: Radical Cinemas of Latin America

An introductory overview of Latin American cinema, with an emphasis on post-World War II films produced in Cuba, Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Examination of each film in its historical and aesthetic aspects, and in light of questions concerning national cinema and “third cinema.” Examples from both pre-1945 and contemporary films. Conducted in English; knowledge of Spanish and Portuguese helpful but not required.

Professor: Moira Fradinger
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: M 7pm-11pm W 7pm-8:50pm

FILM 778: Russian Literature and Film in the 1920s and 1930s

This course presents a historical overview, incorporating some of the main landmarks of the 1920s and 1930s including works by Pilnyak, Bakhtin, the Formalists, Platonov, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov, Zoshchenko, Eisenstein, Protazanov, Pudovkin, the Vasilyev “brothers,” and G. Aleksandrov.

Professor: Katerina Clark
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: W 1:30pm-3:20pm T 7pm-10pm

FILM 833: Semiotics

Digging into semiotics tradition, the seminar provides analytical tools for “close readings” of a vast array of objects and operations, from verbal texts to all sorts of images, from cultural practices to all sorts of manipulation. Semiotics’ foundational goal consisted in retracing how meaning emerges in these objects and operations, how it circulates within and between different cultural environments, and how it affects and is affected by the cultural contexts in which these objects and operations are embedded. To revamp semiotics’ main tasks, after an introduction about the idea of “making meaning,” the seminar engages students in a weekly discussion about situations, procedures, objects, and attributes that are “meaningful,” in the double sense that they have meaning and they arrange reality in a meaningful way. Objects of analysis are intentionally disparate; the constant application of a set of analytical tools provides the coherence of the seminar. Students are expected to regularly attend the seminar, actively participate in discussions, propose new objects of analysis, present a case study (fifteen–twenty minutes), and write a final paper (max. 5,000 words). Enrollment limited to fifteen.

Students from Film and Media Studies and the School of Architecture have priority: they are asked to express their choice by August 25. Students from other departments are asked to send the instructor up to ten lines with the reasons why they want to attend the seminar by August 26. The seminar is aimed at bolstering a dialogue that crosses cultures and disciplines.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: T 2pm-3:50pm

FILM 810: Visual Kinship, Families, and Photography

Exploration of the history and practice of family photography from an interdisciplinary perspective. Study of family photographs from the analog to the digital era, from snapshots to portraits, and from instrumental images to art exhibitions. Particular attention to the ways in which family photographs have helped establish gendered and racial hierarchies and examination of recent ways of reconceiving these images.

Professor: Laura Wexler
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: F 1:30pm-3:20pm

FILM 873: Japanese Cinema and Its Others

Critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analysis of how Japanese film and media historically represent “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including women, black residents, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBTQ minorities, the disabled, youth, and monstrous others such as ghosts.

Professor: Aaron Gerow
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: W 7pm-10pm TTh 11:35am-12:50pm

Film 900 Directed Reading

Directed Reading

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: NA

FILM 901: Inividual Research

Individual Research

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: NA