Graduate Courses

Film 363/ Film 690 RadicalCinemas of Latin America

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Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 7.00-8.50p

Film 423/ Film 733 Documentary and the Environment

The environmental documentary has emerged as one of cinema’s most vital genres of the past ten years (in documentary, its only rivals are probably those concerned with the Second Gulf War). As the world’s environment faces a growing crisis, documentary has come to serve as a key means to draw public attention to specific issues. This course combines screenings with readings on documentary such as Bill Nichols’s important book Representing Reality. Often films have book tie-ins, and we consider how they complement each other and work together to maximize the impact of their message. Readings also focus on news items, debates, Web sites, and other media forms that are employed in conjunction with the films.

Professor: Charles Musser
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018

Film 455/ Film 735 Documentary Film Workshop

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Film and Media Studies or American Studies who are making documentaries as senior projects.

 

Seniors in other majors admitted as space permits.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 10.30-1.20

Film 456/Film 736 Documentary Film Workshop

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Film and Media Studies or American Studies who are making documentaries as senior projects.

Seniors in other majors admitted as space permits.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: W 12.30-3.20

Film 765 The Films of Fassbinder, Herzog, and Haneke

Examination of representative films by three major German-language auteurs. Topics include cinema’s investment in painting and theatricality; its relation to gendered, imaginary, and abject bodies and to the specificities of time and place; the fictions of the self that these auteurs construct; and how questions of identity intersect with ideology and the political. Films subtitled; all readings and discussion in English.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Th 1.30-3.20

Film 778 Russian Literature and Film in the 1920s and 1930s

This course presents a historical overview, incorporating some of the main landmarks of the 1920s and 1930s including works by Pilnyak, Bakhtin, the Formalists, Platonov, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov, Zoshchenko, Eisenstein, Protazanov, Pudovkin, the Vasilyev “brothers,” and G. Aleksandrov.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 1.30-3.20

Film 788 Music, Radio, and Mediation

This seminar focuses on the heyday of radio—its so-called Golden Age—and considers the medium from a variety of perspectives: media theory, auditory culture, musicology, and sociology, among others. The goal is to understand how radio functioned not only as a mass medium but also as a form of mediation. Special attention is given to the role of music on the radio and to the ways that radio altered the nature of musical works. Readings include classic texts on radio (Arnheim, Adorno, Merton, Lazarsfeld, Fanon, McLuhan) as well as more recent writing in cultural history (Douglas, Hilmes), sound studies (Mowitt, Bijsterveld), and media archaeology (Ernst). Special attention is given to the nature of the radio archive and its problems, with sessions devoted to working with source materials.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: T 9.25-11.15

Film 796 Media Archaeologies: The Visual and the Environmental

The seminar aims at retracing two divergent cultural processes: how and why, starting from the discovery of artificial perspective, an increasing number of cultural practices were devoted to making the world visible; and correlatively how and why, starting from the first half of the nineteenth century, visuality increasingly met with the resistance of other modes of accessing the world through the human body and the role of the environment? These two trajectories are retraced through a special attention to the media that were on the forefront of these cultural processes: from Brunelleschi’s mirror to Alberti’s window and grid, from camera obscura to Galileo’s telescope, from Panorama to Phantasmagoria, from the optical toys of the nineteenth century to the increasing implication of art into social and political questions. The seminar privileges the cultural practices that underpin both the trust in visuality and the discovery of environmentality, and it gives due attention to the political questions that the changing fortunes of the optical media imply. The seminar is the first part of a two-year project and will be followed next year by an analysis of the prevalence of the environmental dimension in contemporary media.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: M 3.30-5.20

FILM 810: Visual Kinship, Families, and Photography

Exploration of the history and practice of family photography from an interdisciplinary perspective. Study of family photographs from the analog to the digital era, from snapshots to portraits, and from instrumental images to art exhibitions. Particular attention to the ways in which family photographs have helped establish gendered and racial hierarchies and examination of recent ways of reconceiving these images.

Professor: Laura Wexler
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: T 1.30-3.20

Film 874 Japanese New Wave Cinema

This course explores the “New Wave” in Japanese cinema in the context of the rise of “new wave” across cinemas in the American sphere in the period roughly between 1955 and 1975. It focuses on both local contexts and global flows in the turn to experimental filmmaking in Japan, paying particular attention to how films sought to make social and political interventions in both content and form. We analyze New Wave films and critical writing by asking what they can tell us about Japan’s postwar, high-speed economic growth, student and counterculture movements, and place in the Cold War order. We also consider what the Japanese New Wave tells us about the possibilities of cinema: its global simultaneity, transcultural movement, and historical trajectory. Topics include the legacy of World War II in Japan and cinema as a mode for narrating history; the rise of global youth culture in the context of postwar economic growth; cinema and protest against the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty; the aesthetic use of sex, violence, and politics to shock mainstream culture; documentary as a site for radical experimentation; the studio system, independent filmmaking, and transformations of the Japanese film industry; and what is meant by “modernist” and “avant-garde” in New Wave cinema.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: MW 1.00-2.15

FILM 901: Individual Research

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017