Courses

Undergraduate

Film 457 Italian Film from Postwar to Postmodern

A study of important Italian films from World War II to the present. Consideration of works that typify major directors and trends. Topics include neorealism, self-reflexivity and metacinema, fascism and war, and postmodernism. Films by Fellini, Antonioni, Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Pasolini, Bertolucci, Wertmuller, Tornatore, and Moretti.

 

Most films in Italian with English subtitles.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: TTh 4.00-5.15

Film 020 Literature, Media, and The Arts

Interdisciplinary overview of how weather serves as a topic of human imagination and invention across such domains as literature and science, philosophy and religion, painting and popular culture. The stories we tell about weather, the temperamental and nebulous materials of weather, and the media that helps us understand it and shape it. Readings include poems, prose, and academic articles.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program. 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: MW 9.00-10.15

Film 045 Dance on Film

An examination of dance on film from c. 1920 to the present, including early Hollywood pictures, the rise of Bollywood, avant-garde films of the postwar period, translations of stage choreography to screen, music videos, and dance film festivals. The impact of industry, circulation and audience, aesthetic lineages, and craft in the union of the two mediums. Students develop an original short film for a final class project.

 

No prior dance or filmmaking experience necessary. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Professor: Emily Coates
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: MW 11.35-12:50

Film 053 Blue

The cultural and iconic history of the color blue and its role as both a method and a motive for making work in the studio. The word “blue” and its etymological core, evocative connotations, colloquial nuance, and semantic role in different languages and cultures; scientific and sociological issues; blue in film and the fine arts. Projects experiment with writing, collecting, collage, and digital video. Use of materials from the Beinecke Library.

 

Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 2.30-4.20

Film 150 Introduction to Film Studies

A survey of film studies concentrating on theory, analysis, and criticism. Students learn the critical and technical vocabulary of the subject and study important films in weekly screenings.

 

Prerequisite for the major.

Professor: John MacKay
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: TTh 1.30-2.20

FILM 160: Introduction to Media

Introduction to the long history of media as understood in classical and foundational (and even more recent experimental) theories. Topics involve the technologies of modernity, reproduction, and commodity, as well as questions regarding knowledge, representation, public spheres, and spectatorship. Special attention given to philosophies of language, visuality, and the environment, including how digital culture continues to shape these realms.

Prerequisite for the major.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: T Th 1:30- 2:20

FILM 162: Introductory Documentary Filmmaking

The art and craft of documentary filmmaking. Basic technological and creative tools for capturing and editing moving images. The processes of research, planning, interviewing, writing, and gathering of visual elements to tell a compelling story with integrity and responsibility toward the subject. The creation of nonfiction narratives. Issues include creative discipline, ethical questions, space, the recreation of time, and how to represent “the truth.” Materials fee: $150.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: M 1.30-5.20

Film 210 Philosophy of Digital Media

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Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: MW 10.30-11.20

Film 244 Media and Medicine in Modern America

Relationships between medicine, health, and the media in the United States from 1870 to the present. The changing role of the media in shaping conceptions of the body, creating new diseases, influencing health and health policy, crafting the image of the medical profession, informing expectations of medicine and constructions of citizenship, and the medicalization of American life.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: MW 10.30-11.20

Film 273 Cinema of the Black Diaspora

The politics, aesthetics, and social conditions that inform film movements across the black diaspora, including Caribbean, African, and especially black British cinema. Students consider the visualization of desire, sexuality, and erotic identification, and the political implications of exploring these themes with respect to black embodiment onscreen; and how this knowledge can be brought to bear on the aesthetic significance and cultural growth and development of a black diasporic film tradition.

 

Prerequisite: One AFAM course, or a course on race, gender, sexuality, or instructor permission.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 2.30-4.30

Film 319 The Third Reich in Postwar German Film, 1945-2007

Close study of the intersection of aesthetics and ethics with regard to how German films, since 1945, have dealt with Nazi history. Through the study of German-language films (with subtitles), produced in postwar East, West, and unified Germany through 2007, students consider and challenge perspectives on the Third Reich and postwar Germany, while learning basic categories of film studies.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: M 3.30-5.30

FILM 320: Close Analysis of Film

Ways in which traditional genres and alternative film forms establish or subvert convention and expectation and express thematic and ideological concerns. The balancing of narrative containment and excess, as well as action and image. Use of body and voice, space and music. Examples include films by Antonioni, Zhang, Ozu, and Hitchcock.

Prerequisite: FILM 150.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: M 1.30-3.20

FILM 350:Screenwriting

A beginning course in screenplay writing. Foundations of the craft introduced through the reading of professional scripts and the analysis of classic films. A series of classroom exercises culminates in intensive scene work.

Prerequisite: FILM 150. Not open to freshmen.

Professor: Marc Lapadula
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Th 3.30-5.20

FILM 355: Intermediate Film Writing and Directing

In the first half of the term, students write three-scene short films and learn the tools and techniques of staging, lighting, and capturing and editing the dramatic scene. In the second half of the term, students work collaboratively to produce their films. Focus on using the tools of cinema to tell meaningful dramatic stories. Materials fee: $150.

Enrollment limited to 8. Priority to majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies. Prerequisites: ART 141 or 142, and FILM 150.

Professor: Jonathan Andrews
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: W 1.30-5.20

FILM 356:Intermediate Documentary Filmmaking

Students explore the storytelling potential of the film medium by making documentary art. The class concentrates on finding and capturing intriguing, complex scenarios in the world and then adapting them to the film form. Questions of truth, objectivity, style, and the filmmaker’s ethics are considered using examples of students’ work. Exercises in storytelling principles. Materials fee: $150.

Limited enrollment. Priority to majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies. Prerequisites: ART 141 or 142, and FILM 150

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: T 1.30-5.20

Film 359 Introduction to Sound Studies

A broad introduction to sound studies, an emerging field that analyzes both the technologies and the cultural techniques involved in the production, reception, and meaning of sound and listening. Topics include soundscapes, voice, modes of listening, audio technologies, electronic music, and noise. How sound studies intersects with more traditional methods of music studies.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: TTh 1.00-2.15

Film 364 Milos Forman and His Films

An in-depth examination of selected films by Milos Forman and representatives of the New Wave, cinéma vérité in Czech filmmaking. Special attention to Forman’s artistic and aesthetic development as a Hollywood director in such films as Hair, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ragtime, and Amadeus.

 

Screenings and discussion in English.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Th 1.30-3.20

Film 368 The Culture of the Cold War in Europe

European culture during and after the Cold War. Focus on the relation of politics and dominant ideologies to their correlative literary and cinematic aesthetics models and to popular culture. Themes include totalitarianism, Eurocommunism, decolonization, espionage, state surveillance, the nuclear threat, sports, and propaganda.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Th 1.30-3.20

FILM 395:Intermediate Screenwriting

A workshop in writing short screenplays. Frequent revisions of each student’s script focus on uniting narrative, well-delineated characters, dramatic action, tone, and dialogue into a polished final screenplay.

Prerequisite: FILM 350. Priority to majors in Film & Media Studies.

Professor: Marc Lapadula
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: W 7.00-8.50p

FILM 397: Writing about the Performing Arts

Introduction to journalistic reporting on performances as current events, with attention to writing in newspapers, magazines, and the blogosphere. The idea of the audience explored in relation to both a live act or screening and a piece of writing about such an event. Students attend screenings and live professional performances of plays, music concerts, and dance events.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: TTh 11.35-12.50

FILM 411: The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

An examination of Hitchcock’s career as a filmmaker from Blackmail to Frenzy, with close attention to the wide variety of critical and theoretical approaches to his work. Topics include the status of the image; the representation of the feminine and of the body; spectatorship; painterliness and theatricality; generic and psychoanalytic issues.

Professor: Brigitte Peucker
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: Th 1.30-3.20

Film 442 The City in Literature and Film

Consideration of the architecture, town planning, and symbolic functions of various cities in Europe, Latin America, the United States, and East Asia. Discussion of the representation of these cities in literature and film. Works include older Soviet and Chinese films about Shanghai and contemporary films about Hong Kong and Beijing.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: TTh 1.00-2.15

Film 454 Narrating the Lives of Refugees

Analysis of contemporary representations of refugee experiences with special attention to the processes by which war, colonialism, displacement, encampment, and racialization shape the lives of refugees in New Haven and beyond. Topics include the representation of refugees as a source of political crisis; one dimensional representations of refugees as victims in need of rescue, national subjects unfit for citizenship, and as a political and social threat; and how current refugee problems create definitional difficulties for states and international agencies.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: M 1.30-3.20

Film 459/ Film 765 The Films of Fassbinder, Herzog, and Haneke

Examination of representative films by three major German language auteurs. Topics include cinema’s investment in painting and theatricality, its relation to gendered, imaginary, and abject bodies and to the specificities of time and place; the fictions of the self that these auteurs construct; and how questions of identity intersect with ideology and the political.
Films subtitled; all readings and discussion in English.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Th 1.30-3.20

Film 471 Independent Study

For students who wish to explore an aspect of film and media studies not covered by existing courses. The course may be used for research or directed readings and should include one lengthy essay or several short ones as well as regular meetings with the adviser. To apply, students should present a prospectus, a bibliography for the work proposed, and a letter of support from the adviser to the director of undergraduate studies. Term credit for independent research or reading may be granted and applied to any of the requisite areas upon application and approval by the director of undergraduate studies.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017, Term: Fall 2017

Film 483 Film 494 Advanced Film Writing and Directing

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies making senior projects. Each student writes and directs a short fiction film. The first term focuses on the screenplay, production schedule, storyboards, casting, budget, and locations. In the second term students rehearse, shoot, edit, and screen the film. Materials fee: $150.

 

Enrollment limited to 8. Priority to majors in Art and in Film & Media Studies. Prerequisite: ART 341.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017, Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Th 1.30-5.20

FILM 487/488: Advanced Screenwriting

Students write a feature-length screenplay. Emphasis on multiple drafts and revision. Admission in the fall term based on acceptance of a complete step-sheet outline for the story to be written during the coming year.

Primarily for Film & Media Studies majors working on senior projects. Prerequisite: FILM 395 or permission of instructor.

 
 
Professor: Marc Lapadula
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018, Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Th 3.30-5.20

Film 491/492 The Senior Essay

An independent writing and research project. A prospectus signed by the student’s adviser must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the end of the second week of the term in which the essay project is to commence. A rough draft must be submitted to the adviser and the director of undergraduate studies approximately one month before the final draft is due. Essays are normally thirty-five pages long (one term) or fifty pages (two terms).

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017, Term: Fall 2017

Film 493/494: The Senior Project

For students making a film or video, either fiction or nonfiction, as their senior project. Senior projects require the approval of the Film and Media Studies Committee and are based on proposals submitted at the end of the junior year. An interim project review takes place at the end of the fall term, and permission to complete the senior project can be withdrawn if satisfactory progress has not been made. For guidelines, consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Does not count toward the fourteen courses required for the major when taken in conjunction with FILM 455, 456 or FILM 483, 484.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017, Term: Summer 2017
Undergraduate, Graduate

Film 363/ Film 690 RadicalCinemas of Latin America

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Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 7.00-8.50p

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Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 7.00-8.50p

Film 423/ Film 733 Documentary and the Environment

The environmental documentary has emerged as one of cinema’s most vital genres of the past ten years (in documentary, its only rivals are probably those concerned with the Second Gulf War). As the world’s environment faces a growing crisis, documentary has come to serve as a key means to draw public attention to specific issues. This course combines screenings with readings on documentary such as Bill Nichols’s important book Representing Reality. Often films have book tie-ins, and we consider how they complement each other and work together to maximize the impact of their message. Readings also focus on news items, debates, Web sites, and other media forms that are employed in conjunction with the films.

Professor: Charles Musser
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018

The environmental documentary has emerged as one of cinema’s most vital genres of the past ten years (in documentary, its only rivals are probably those concerned with the Second Gulf War). As the world’s environment faces a growing crisis, documentary has come to serve as a key means to draw public attention to specific issues. This course combines screenings with readings on documentary such as Bill Nichols’s important book Representing Reality. Often films have book tie-ins, and we consider how they complement each other and work together to maximize the impact of their message. Readings also focus on news items, debates, Web sites, and other media forms that are employed in conjunction with the films.

Professor: Charles Musser
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018

Film 455/ Film 735 Documentary Film Workshop

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Film and Media Studies or American Studies who are making documentaries as senior projects.

 

Seniors in other majors admitted as space permits.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 10.30-1.20

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Film and Media Studies or American Studies who are making documentaries as senior projects.

 

Seniors in other majors admitted as space permits.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 10.30-1.20

Film 456/Film 736 Documentary Film Workshop

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Film and Media Studies or American Studies who are making documentaries as senior projects.

Seniors in other majors admitted as space permits.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: W 12.30-3.20

A yearlong workshop designed primarily for majors in Film and Media Studies or American Studies who are making documentaries as senior projects.

Seniors in other majors admitted as space permits.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: W 12.30-3.20
Graduate

Film 765 The Films of Fassbinder, Herzog, and Haneke

Examination of representative films by three major German-language auteurs. Topics include cinema’s investment in painting and theatricality; its relation to gendered, imaginary, and abject bodies and to the specificities of time and place; the fictions of the self that these auteurs construct; and how questions of identity intersect with ideology and the political. Films subtitled; all readings and discussion in English.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: Th 1.30-3.20

Film 778 Russian Literature and Film in the 1920s and 1930s

This course presents a historical overview, incorporating some of the main landmarks of the 1920s and 1930s including works by Pilnyak, Bakhtin, the Formalists, Platonov, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov, Zoshchenko, Eisenstein, Protazanov, Pudovkin, the Vasilyev “brothers,” and G. Aleksandrov.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: W 1.30-3.20

Film 788 Music, Radio, and Mediation

This seminar focuses on the heyday of radio—its so-called Golden Age—and considers the medium from a variety of perspectives: media theory, auditory culture, musicology, and sociology, among others. The goal is to understand how radio functioned not only as a mass medium but also as a form of mediation. Special attention is given to the role of music on the radio and to the ways that radio altered the nature of musical works. Readings include classic texts on radio (Arnheim, Adorno, Merton, Lazarsfeld, Fanon, McLuhan) as well as more recent writing in cultural history (Douglas, Hilmes), sound studies (Mowitt, Bijsterveld), and media archaeology (Ernst). Special attention is given to the nature of the radio archive and its problems, with sessions devoted to working with source materials.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: T 9.25-11.15

Film 796 Media Archaeologies: The Visual and the Environmental

The seminar aims at retracing two divergent cultural processes: how and why, starting from the discovery of artificial perspective, an increasing number of cultural practices were devoted to making the world visible; and correlatively how and why, starting from the first half of the nineteenth century, visuality increasingly met with the resistance of other modes of accessing the world through the human body and the role of the environment? These two trajectories are retraced through a special attention to the media that were on the forefront of these cultural processes: from Brunelleschi’s mirror to Alberti’s window and grid, from camera obscura to Galileo’s telescope, from Panorama to Phantasmagoria, from the optical toys of the nineteenth century to the increasing implication of art into social and political questions. The seminar privileges the cultural practices that underpin both the trust in visuality and the discovery of environmentality, and it gives due attention to the political questions that the changing fortunes of the optical media imply. The seminar is the first part of a two-year project and will be followed next year by an analysis of the prevalence of the environmental dimension in contemporary media.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: M 3.30-5.20

FILM 810: Visual Kinship, Families, and Photography

Exploration of the history and practice of family photography from an interdisciplinary perspective. Study of family photographs from the analog to the digital era, from snapshots to portraits, and from instrumental images to art exhibitions. Particular attention to the ways in which family photographs have helped establish gendered and racial hierarchies and examination of recent ways of reconceiving these images.

Professor: Laura Wexler
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2018
Day/Time: T 1.30-3.20

Film 874 Japanese New Wave Cinema

This course explores the “New Wave” in Japanese cinema in the context of the rise of “new wave” across cinemas in the American sphere in the period roughly between 1955 and 1975. It focuses on both local contexts and global flows in the turn to experimental filmmaking in Japan, paying particular attention to how films sought to make social and political interventions in both content and form. We analyze New Wave films and critical writing by asking what they can tell us about Japan’s postwar, high-speed economic growth, student and counterculture movements, and place in the Cold War order. We also consider what the Japanese New Wave tells us about the possibilities of cinema: its global simultaneity, transcultural movement, and historical trajectory. Topics include the legacy of World War II in Japan and cinema as a mode for narrating history; the rise of global youth culture in the context of postwar economic growth; cinema and protest against the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty; the aesthetic use of sex, violence, and politics to shock mainstream culture; documentary as a site for radical experimentation; the studio system, independent filmmaking, and transformations of the Japanese film industry; and what is meant by “modernist” and “avant-garde” in New Wave cinema.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2017
Day/Time: MW 1.00-2.15

FILM 901: Individual Research

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017